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Kosherpages Updates

March 05 Kosherpages launches 

December 05 - KP goes national.

June 06 - KP launches business networking events

January 07 - 1st B2B tradeshow

January 08 - 1st Kosher Lifestyle Show

August 08 - Parent & child networking event at the Odeon Manchester

September 08
- Launch of new film review section

September 08 - KP announces The Fed as chosen charity for this year

November 08 - Launch of new Medical Blog By Dr. Martin Harris

March 09 - Kosher Lifestyle Show Manchester

March 09 - Launch of The Kosher Brochure

May 10 - New Owners of KosherPages

June 10 - New look KosherPages

July 10 - KosherPages expands to include Jewish communities nation wide

July 10 - Pick of the Week is introduced to KosherPages - A joke, a quote, a Dvar Torah and more

August 10 - KosherPages now has a Facebook group - come and join us!

November 10 - Your health matters is added to KosherPages

November 10 - New addition to KosherPages - Kosher Fitness column

January 11 - KosherPages introduces "Your Pix" to Pick of the Week

July 11 - Safety First section is added to KosherPages

November 11 - The KosherPages Facebook group reaches 1,000 members

November 11 - KosherPages introduces the monthly competition

March 12 - KosherPages introduces new style "Shabbos Times & More" email. Click here to subscribe.

 

 

 

What is Kosher?

 

A very basic overview of what is Kosher and what is not Kosher
 
What is kosher food?

 
Millions of people, from various religious and ethnic backgrounds, eat kosher food for religious, cultural, health and quality reasons. Jews, Muslims, Hindus, Seventh Day Adventists, Jehovah's Witnesses, Vegetarians, Lactose-Intolerant and others may share an interest in kosher food, but their definitions of kosher food may vary.
  
Kashrut is the body of Jewish law dealing with what foods we can and cannot eat and how those foods must be prepared and eaten. "Kashrut" is the same root as the more commonly known word "kosher," which describes food that meets these standards.

Contrary to popular misconception, rabbis or other religious officials do not "bless" food to make it kosher. There are blessings that observant Jews recite over food before eating it, but these blessings have nothing to do with making the food kosher. Food can be kosher without a rabbi ever becoming involved with it. Vegetables from your garden for example, are undoubtedly kosher (as long as they are bug-free as bugs are not kosher!).

In our modern world of processed foods, it is difficult to know what ingredients are in your food and how they were processed, so it is helpful to have a rabbi examine the food and its processing and assure kosher consumers that the food is kosher.

Kosher dietary laws are observed all year round. There are additional dietary restrictions during Pesach, and many foods that are kosher for year-round use are not "kosher for Passover." A bagel, for example, can be kosher for year-round use but is certainly not kosher for Passover! Foods that are kosher for Passover, however, are always kosher for year-round use.

Chinese food can be kosher if it is prepared in accordance with Jewish law, and there are many fine kosher Chinese restaurants. Traditional Ashkenazic Jewish foods like knishes, bagels, blintzes, and matzah ball soup can all be non-kosher if not prepared in accordance with Jewish law.

Food that is not kosher is commonly referred to as treif. Originally, "treifa" was a term for one of the categories of non-Kosher meat. The literal meaning of "treifa" is torn or mortally wounded. It is written, "Do not eat meat from an animal torn (treifa) in the field" (Exodus 22:30).

The rabbis interpreted this to mean that any animal or fowl which, as a result of a birth defect, disease or inflicted wound, suffers from a mortally defective organ or limb (or an animal close to death) may be considered a treifa or non-kosher.

Even when an animal which is generally a kosher animal, is slaughtered in a kosher way, the meat could be non-kosher if certain defects in the animal are found. Lesions, lacerations, broken limbs, missing or punctured organs, or the result of an attack by a larger animal are all defects that make an animal a treifa.

Whilst originally the term treifa referred to the meat from an animal with certain defects, today treif is used for all non-kosher products.

All fruits and vegetables are kosher, however, bugs and worms that may be found in some fruits and vegetables are not kosher. Fruits and vegetables that are prone to infestation should be inspected to ensure that they contain no bugs. Leafy vegetables like lettuce and herbs and flowery vegetables like broccoli and cauliflower are particularly prone to bugs and should be inspected carefully. Strawberries and raspberries can also be problematic.
 

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